Newt Gingrich Says It Straight

Refreshingly blunt: Newt Gingrich

 

 

The CNA has an interesting article about some remarks of the 2012 presidential candidate Newt Gingrich.

First, there is this interesting remark:

“Any leader should seek God’s guidance,” he said. “The teachings of the Church inform my thinking about solving earthly problems.”

I do not know to what extent Gingrich practices what he preaches, but I can’t say he is preaching badly. The idea that a Catholic could be allowed to forget his faith when voting or taking political decisions is certainly being challenged more and more often.

Please also note that Gingrich correctly says “the Church” instead of, say, “my Church”.

The most interesting part is, though, the following one:

Gingrich said that he would “listen” to the concerns of those who feel threatened by his views and values.

“In many cases better communications and clarification will eliminate their worries,” he said.

“In some cases they are right to feel threatened because we have incompatible values and fundamentally different visions of the future.”

It is the first time that I read of a Presidential candidate saying to the anti-Christians fraction such open words, “you are right to feel threatened”. They are right to feel threatened because they are a threat to Christianity and their right to damage Christianity would therefore be taken away.

He is basically saying that there will no namby pamby slogans about everyone not having anything to fear, and a Christian society being able to be Christian and at the same time accommodate everyone’s whims, like, say, your British bishop would do.This kind of open talk is very, very rare in Europe and is probable to have one accused of being an extremist.

If a conservative President is elected, a march toward the curtailing of legal right will be set in motion, either through direct presidential action or through legislative action – if the President disposes of the necessary majorities in Senate and Congress, which I consider rather probable – or more long-term with the attempt to appoint decent Supreme Court judges instead of, say, left-wing lesbians.

It is good and honest that these things are said loud and clear, and become an integral part of the electoral campaign. It is also refreshing that Gingrich doesn’t try to use the usual European tactics of “do not worry, we’ll make everyone happy anyway” and says instead that, legislatively speaking at least, there will be blood.

How refreshing.

Please do not use the combox to write your opinion about Mr Gingrich as a candidate, as I think that such discussion belong elsewhere – I might make a poll in future about this -. The matter here is, as I see it, not whether Mr Gingrich is a good candidate or even a good man, but whether the debate is going to go in the direction of frontal assault to anti-Christian legislation. If anyone could provide a parallel statement of other candidates, this could be very interesting.

Mundabor

 

 

 

 

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Posted on October 31, 2011, in Catholicism and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. I am considering voting for Gingrich in the Primary. It will be either Cain or Gingrich. Did you hear this speech? http://jlue.wordpress.com/2011/11/01/should-he-be-president/

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