The Little Guide To Sound Catholicism


Santo subito! Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre.

I have received a message from a reader; she laudably realises her Catholicism has been polluted by V II rubbish, and asks me for suggestions to create a good and sound Catholic foundation.

I would personally tackle the matter in two phases: the foundation itself and those texts particularly devoted to the distortions and trouble of the V II theology reaching its implosion in these decades under our very eyes. This would give a very solid knowledge of where we are as opposed to where we should be. Of course, from there the journey can go pretty much everywhere, as by God’s grace we now have an immensely vast choice of traditional books on the Internet.

Firstly, though, a recommendation:the one to buy good Catholic apps if one has a smartphone or a tablet. I go as far as to say that the Catholic apps available are, in fact, reason enough to buy one of those devices if one hasn’t done so already. Similarly, the purchase of a tablet and the download of a Kindle app will allow one to save the money for the Kindle device if one does not read for many hours on end.

For the first phase, I suggest the following:

1. Throw away your JP II catechism. No, I really mean throw it away. Whilst generally orthodox, it has questionable phrasing and suggestive, covertly accommodating theology on several issues (see baptism and salvation). The Abbé de Nantes found it heretical in twelve points.

Let me repeat it: throw it away. You can thank me later. For the sake of clarity, the compendium appeared in 2005 (Ratzinger’s) is fine, and the Abbé de Nantes himself recognised none of the twelve heretical points of the “Schoenborn” catechism were therein contained.

2. Catholic apps (like Ipieta, a must!) or electronic books or, in case, print allow one to easily access the following:

A. Penny Catechism.

This is the ideal text to start from scratch in redoing one’s thinking. You can buy it on the Internet for a pittance, probably on apps too. He who masters the Penny Catechism is way in front of 90% of V II priests, and can already teach Francis the basics. Already the Penny Catechism shames our inglorious Bishop of Rome page by page. You compare it and Francis’ uninterrupted, obscene waffle and understand they are on two different planets already.

B. Baltimore Catechisms

There are three of them in growing order of difficulty, plus a fourth which is the third with commentary. The first three are on Ipieta, which also has a number of other old catechisms and even the Compendium. The purchase of Ipieta is, again, invaluable. A wealth of Catholic wisdom of all sorts always with you! Don’t delay, buy today! I doubt I will read in a lifetime the hundreds of text therein contained. Seriously, Ipieta is not a weapon, but an entire arsenal of Catholicism.

If one has already digested the Penny Catechism, I suggest to go directly to Baltimore III. There is no real need for a commentary (which a I found very good, though) as the Baltimore Catechisms are of exemplary clarity but still accessible for everyone.

When one has these two well assimilated, he is already equipped to properly interpret every antic of Francis and see the magnitude of this man’s – and of many V II priests’ – confusion.

C. Other catechisms.

Again, IPieta has a nice choice. The catechism of St. Pius the X is wonderful but as far as I know there are no official English translations. I found the Italian text online, and it’s as good as you expect. But in general I would say there’s no need to have many catechisms: pick a sound one, and absorb its content well.

At this point, I would proceed with some texts aiming at a specific comparison between “old” and “new”: the 2000 years of tradition and the 50 years (and counting) of drunken madness.

I mention here only some fundamental works, which will be reading enough:

1. Iota unum

The printed edition is expensive but I found it well worth the expense. SSPX Asia have a free electronic version on their site. You may check if it is available as electronic book. My copy is invaluable, and to me one of those “desert island books”.

2. “The Catechism of the Crisis in the Church””

This is not a catechism, but a SSPX publication, available on kindle. In general, absolutely everything one can read from the SSPX is wonderful and above suspicion, albeit I do allow myself – like many others among their supporters – to attend the V II mass. There were long discussions about this, so please refrain from starting a new one. Back to the matter at hand, this book is an excellent comparison between timeless truth and convenient accommodation or outright lie. Obligatory reading, if you ask me, for the aspiring Traditionalist.

3. One Hundred Years of Modernism

This is another SSPX book, also available on Kindle. It explains – giving a sound philosophical introduction – how the cancer of Modernism found its way in the organism of the Church. Not easy subject matter – it will help a lot if you have studied philosophy at school or university – but explained with exemplary clarity. If you are not trained in philosophy, this will require some work, but the reward will be rich.

4. Life of Christ

This is in my eyes the most glorious of Fulton Sheen’s books. A joy to read and re-read. Archbishop Sheen packs his book with so many sound and easy to understand explanations of Catholic teaching that this book can be considered a kind of subsidiary catechism in itself. I have the paper version, I think it is also on Kindle now. This book is also a formidable weapon to address the remarks of sceptics and infidels.

5. “Life Everlasting” & any Garrigou-Lagrange Book. 

Well, any of them at a more advanced level. I have read four: “Reality”, “Predestination”, “Providence” and “Life Everlasting”.

The first three are more complicated, and the first two of them require either a philosophical foundation or the willingness to plow through it page by page. The fourth is a very good integration to a Catechism in matters of salvation and damnation, and it is written in a much more accessible way than the other three books.

The list could go on, but I think the sources mentioned provide already a more than solid ground, and if properly absorbed would put one well in the front row of the Army of Christ, at least as far as weaponry is concerned.

Two things to conclude:

1. Buy Ipieta.

2. Always pay attention to catechesis texts, even if before Vatican II. I once bought on Kindle a book from a chap called Karl Adam without knowing who he was, merely browsing Kindle for pre-V II theologians. Utter rubbish, I tell you. Again, I could immediately see it was rubbish because once you have the fundamentals down well, you will be able to smell the smoke from pretty far away.

So, that was that then, and again for a first plunge in sound Catholicism it is more than enough. It must be clear that infinite other choices are thinkable, this is just one possible path among very many.

The most beautiful effect of being grounded solidly in Truth (wretched sinners as we all are, of course) is that no antics of this or that stupid bishop, drunken Cardinal or diva Pope will ever confuse you again.

I have stated in the past, and repeat here, that Truth is as hard, and as beautiful, as a diamond. Once you have mastered the use of the diamond (and you need not be an expert theologian for that; nowadays most of them seem to lose their faith anyway; just be prayerful and sincerely desirous to know the a Truth and submit to it, and to live it as well as you can) you will be able to cut through every Modernist or Zeno-Modernist rubbish in no time.

Have fun.

And buy IPieta.

Mundabor

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Posted on January 24, 2014, in Catholicism, Conservative Catholicism, FSSPX, Traditional Catholicism and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 10 Comments.

  1. Mundabor, I am on Amazon right now ordering books. Thank you so much for your advice, and to the reader who asked! Just wanted to mention that there are several offerings, in English, of St. Pius X’s Catechism; hoping they’re the right thing.

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_16?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=catechism+of+st+pius+x&sprefix=Catechism+of+st+%2Cstripbooks%2C410

    I checked the catechisms on my shelf, both are JPII. Thanks for pointing their deficiency out, as my children and I reference them often.

  2. I’ll second the ipieta!!! Best $3US will buy!

  3. Excellent!
    I could not find;
    2. “The catechism of V II”
    Have you more info?

    • My apologies, I have checked my Kindle and the title is in fact “The catechism of the crisis in the Church”. I have written the article by memory on the train and have lamentably forgotten to check the titles before publishing.

      Thanks for the help, I have modified the text accordingly. You will like the book.

      M

  4. I am delighted to see Sheen’s LIFE OF CHRIST on your list. I teach that book to 9th graders for Religion Class. It’s wonderful! (Though I think his THE WORLD’S FIRST LOVE may be even more impressive.)

  5. Thank you, Mundabor, for these suggestions. I was unfamiliar with the SSPX publications and look forward to reading them. My gratitude to the reader who prompted this post!

  6. Ubi Maria, ibi Ecclesia

    Mundabor, you mentioned the Baltimore Catechisms above. I just stumbled across a free download here: https://www.pcpbooks.net/docs/baltimore_catechism.pdf

    Of course, one would rather have IPieta.

    Thank you for this. Currently working on Iota unum.

    • Excellent.
      Iota Unum is more than one will have to reflect and pray on in a lifetime.
      Francis is very lucky Amerio doesn’t live anymore.
      M

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