The Catholic Internet Revolution: a take.

Destroyer of Lies

The role of new media and evolving technology has been discussed for some years already. It is now clear that the Internet has revolutionised the world of information, transforming the oligopoly of a limited number of news outlets in a fragmented universe of countless sources of information.

This Michael Voris video examines the difference this made in our specific Catholic world. The following points seem to me particularly important:

1) Information control through a limited number of sources of conventional Catholic wisdom has been broken. The socialist, liberal wave of post – V II lies cannot be freely imparted to the faithful without opposition anymore. The Internet will provide that lies and heresies are exposed. If the shepherd is a bad shepherd, confused or relatively uneducated sheep will nowadays realise it faster and with more certainty than ever before.

2) The Catholic internet revolution (and reform) has been up to now mainly driven by the laity. Whilst some members of the clergy do make a wonderful effort, it is clear that the vast majority of serious Catholic blogs is run by laymen simply fed up with the misinformation, the half truths and the outright lies they have been served with for too long. The revolt against heterodoxy didn’t come from the clergy, but from the pews.

Voris doesn’t say it explicitly, but I think that a further point can be added: Catholic tradition is so strong, its message so powerful, beautiful and immutable that not even 40+ years of systematic neglect or outright attack from the inside could do anything to change it. The Truth will come out, no matter how big the efforts to reshape it to a politically correct lie. The Holy Ghost wants so. Through the Internet, the Truth can easily enter every household. The Internet is therefore a powerful evangelisation tool in a time of almost total failure of those meant to care for it.

You all are, dear readers, part of this. In the next years, the inevitable advance of the internet and of all the applications the Internet makes it possible to utilise will certainly increase the possibility for every serious Catholic to obtain good information and to expose the wolves in sheep’s clothing.

For this reason alone, there would be every reason to be optimistic regarding the quality of Catholic teaching available to the generations to come.

Mundabor

Posted on July 29, 2010, in Catholicism and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I’m sure that, had the Internet not developed the way it has, orthodoxy would not have increased as quickly, especially with laypeople from all around the world sharing their thoughts, information and experiences! Onwards and upwards! 🙂

  2. I fully agree, churchmouse.

    One of the things that I have noticed is that often even when people have a certain discomfort, they will not say it because…. no one says it 😉 Then they go on the internet and discover that the the problem they have is shared by a lot of other people….

    Dr. Howell’s example in the other message is a point in case. Twenty years ago it would have had to be picked up by the national press (possible, but not sure) or remained confined to legal magazines. In 2010 facebook, twitter and the blogosphere have exploded. This is very dangerous is you need a reputation to survive 😉

    M

    M

%d bloggers like this: