A Time For War: “Cristiada”

I have already pointed out in my last blog post about Assisi III that it would be high time to start talking a bit of the Catholic doctrine of war instead of indulging in the usual easy rhetoric of peace. It would appear that there is a good example at hand.

Above is the trailer of Cristiada, a film about the armed insurgence of mexican Christians (and obviously mainly: Catholics) between 1926 and 1929 in reaction to the strongly anti-Christian stance of the Mexican government of the time. When the persecution became open (closing of monasteries, religious schools and convents in the province of Chihuahua, for example; or possibility for the government to regulate the number of priests; or prohibition for priests to wear the clerical garb outside of the church) the rebellion became armed. Somehow, I feel that the movie will not be distributed in the United Kingdom…..

I do not doubt that even today – as, of course, then – there would be those among the Catholics happy to – if put in a similar situation – choose the easy and, most of all, safe role of the prayerful oppressed instead of realising that there is a time for war. Thankfully, in Mexico people who thought differently were enough to carry their fight to victory in the end.

We are, admittedly, not in such a dire situation here in Blighty or in the rest of Europe. But we are certainly nearer to the point of armed conflict now than we were ten or twenty years ago. In fact, a situation might well emerge in the next decades where a Catholic is obliged to choose, like Thomas More, between God and King.

Now don’t get me wrong, democracy is a beautiful thing and one appreciates its ability to achieve long periods of peace and prosperity. One of the most distinctive traits of western democracies is that they don’t go at war with each other; still,they might well go at war against Christianity.

A country in which a supremely stupid Prime Minister says that Christians must be “tolerant” and the Judiciary is right in imposing to them an anti-Christian behaviour is not very far away from the Mexican government of 1926. A country in which laws are proposed – though not passed – by which the selling of Bibles can be seen as “discriminatory” against all the pervert therein condemned is not far away from forfeiting its right to existence. A country unable to distinguish between a man and a woman and two perverts shows that it has squarely put itself in a position of conflict with Christianity a long time ago.

Democracy is, of course, a good thing. But democracy is not our religion. I believe in God, The Father Almighty, not in democracy. When the two come into frontal conflict , I know which side I’m on.

Don’t make of democracy an idol. Democracy is good – and justified in its existence – only as long as it doesn’t explicitly marches against a higher Order.

The Queen’s good servant, and all that……

Mundabor

Posted on April 5, 2011, in Catholicism and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Continuing with your war and peace thinking, here is a post from Edward Feser, a sound thinker who’s published a lot of worthwhile reading on classical philosophy and Thomism.
    It’s a long post, mostly about the legitimacy of capital punishment, but, the beginning of it discusses how the debate is being carried on within the Church and between her and the world. He makes your point about war and peace by coming at it from the situation of the Bishops. Look over the first few paragraphs up to the one beginning: “Something similar can be said of Catholic teaching about capital punishment…”; from there on it’s just about capital punishment.
    Here’s the URL or whatever:
    http://edwardfeser.blogspot.com/2011/04/deadly-unserious.html#more

    • Thanks 308s,

      capital fellow, this Fraser. Though I noticed that he avoid expliocitly saying that on this matter, as in several others, JP II did not disdain to openly flirt with heresy and say what people wanted him to say.

      I wonder how long we’ll have to live with his legacy and how long it will take before we have Popes of the mould of a Pius XII instead.

      M

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