The Utterly Surprising Jesuit: James V Schall On Redistribution

James V Schall

This man – apparently rather well-known; my bad for ignoring his existence, I suppose – is so endowed with common sense and strict reasoning, that I couldn’t believe that he is a Jesuit. I can easily imagine that he will feel very much in the minority among his confreres. Be it as it may, Fr James V Schall has written such a good piece on redistributing wealth, that yours truly couldn’t resist the temptation to spread the sanity.

The arguments are not new, and in fact by reading classics of factual information and common sense like the excellent “The Sceptical Environmentalist” (written, mind you, by a leftist homosexual activist, not yours truly’s favourite kind) one would be perfectly informed about pretty much every one of them. What is notable here is that these arguments are expressed in such a beautiful, pithy way and that they come from, of all people, a Jesuit. Every day a new lesson…

Enjoy some of the most brilliant quotes I have chosen, but I encourage you to enjoy this very short article in full.

Mundabor

Because someone is rich, it does not follow that he is therefore greedy. A poor man is free to be both greedy and envious.

The primary causes of wealth production are brains, effort, and virtue.

At first sight, the oft-repeated lament that the world’s goods need to be “redistributed” for the benefit of the poor seems logical. Usually behind this apparently innocent approach is the idea of the limitation of the world’s “goods.”

Ecology is potentially the best thing ever to have happened to socialism and absolutism, as their advocates realize.

Do we worry about the oil supply for the good folks, if there be any, in AD 4678? in AD 7842? in AD 11369?

America was said to be overcrowded when Columbus discovered it

Suppose, when oil or coal were first discovered that they were defined by some early save-the-earth politician.

If we really want to help the poor to become not poor, the first thing we must do is stop talking of “redistribution,” which is, at bottom, a branch of envy theory. We have to look elsewhere, at innovation, thrift, incentive, proportionate justice, virtue, markets, culture, and growth.

If we really are concerned with the poor, talk of “redistribution” is not worthy of us.

Posted on July 27, 2011, in Catholicism, Good Shepherds and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off on The Utterly Surprising Jesuit: James V Schall On Redistribution.

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