“Time to admit it”: Church is Right on Birth Control

Thought they'd bury the Church, too....

From Business Insider (emphasis mine):

Here’s the thing, though: the Catholic Church is the world’s biggest and oldest organization. It has buried all of the greatest empires known to man, from the Romans to the Soviets. It has establishments literally all over the world, touching every area of human endeavor. It’s given us some of the world’s greatest thinkers, from Saint Augustine on down to René Girard. When it does things, it usually has a good reason. Everyone has a right to disagree, but it’s not that they’re a bunch of crazy old white dudes who are stuck in the Middle Ages.

[…]

Today’s injunctions against birth control were re-affirmed in a 1968 document by Pope Paul VI called Humanae Vitae. He warned of four results if the widespread use of contraceptives was accepted:

General lowering of moral standards
A rise in infidelity, and illegitimacy
The reduction of women to objects used to satisfy men.
Government coercion in reproductive matters.

Does that sound familiar?

Because it sure sounds like what’s been happening for the past 40 years.

[…]

In 1960, 5.3% of all births in America were to unmarried women. By 2010, it was 40.8%

[…]

Human progress is people. Everything that makes life better, from democracy to the economy to the internet to penicillin was either discovered and built by people. More people means more progress. The inventor of the cure for cancer might be someone’s fourth child that they decided not to have.

I particularly liked that last phrase, which reminds me of the posts already written here about the biggest source of economic progress being… people.

But no, let us continue to slowly kill ourselves whilst we kill our values and civilisation. Perhaps the day they are killed through euthanasia because the grateful population can’t be asked to pay for their broth and the latest model of mobile phone at the same time, some people will think the Church wasn’t so stupid after all.

Mundabor

Posted on February 11, 2012, in Catholicism and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. It is refreshing to hear that some people in the media get it (if at least only a little bit).

    Getting the truth to sink in to a myopic liberal democrat is next to impossible ….

    “Many years ago there was a large dinner party at the White House. At one end of the table there were two distinguished women carrying on a conversation. At one point in the conversation, one woman looked at the other and asked a simple question, ‘Why do you think in the United States of America with all of our liberties and all of our freedoms, we have never elected a female president?’

    “The other woman, without looking up from her meal and with a very calm look on her face said, ‘Because you probably aborted her.’ ”

    “The woman who asked that question that day was then First Lady Hillary Clinton. The woman who answered that question was Mother Teresa.”

  2. I can’t fault the logic but I must comment that I’m always slightly uncomfortable when the pro-life argument is phrased in this way, as powerful and convincing as it is to me. Glazed-eyed utilitarians and recruiting sergeants for the latest brotherhoods of man might well concede that it would be a bad thing if the next Alexander Fleming or Tim Tebow didn’t get to enrich us all with their excellence. Their values are rarely as immutable as yours though, and from being pro-abortion in any circumstance the mother chooses, they could easily ride on the premise that genius should not be destroyed to the conclusion that all non-excellent mothers should be compelled to destroy their unborn.

    They’re kind of weird that way.

    • Frank,

      I doubt the premise leads to the conclusion. Besides the fact not even Stalin would reach such apexes of cruelty, in a world where everyone is a genius, no one is. Besides, they’d condemn their own progeny to death.

      M

  3. Hi Mundabor,

    I heard the story from a priest years ago. But I found the dialogue online here from which I pasted:

    http://www.courierpress.com/news/2010/mar/11/making-a-difference/

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