Satan, Suicides, Sugar, Pranks.

Hail mary, conceived without sin, pray for us now and in the hour of our death.

Hail Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us now, and in the hour of our death.

In the last days of the 2008 US Presidential election, Sarah Palin was the victim of a prank. During a radio transmission heard in vast part of the country, the “French President Sarkozy” called to greet and congratulate her. The “French President” was, if memory serves, a professional actor, and Sarah Palin swallowed it hook, line and sinker. It made world news, and the big UK radio stations opened the news with it (gloating, of course) the morning after. Again, the prank happened in front of a big radio audience, just a few days before the US presidential election, when Mrs Palin was fighting for a place in history.

You may be pleased to know that Sarah Palin did not commit suicide.

Actually, she continued to be a very respected and influential politician and went on to become one of the two or three most important driving forces behind the Tea Party.

Whilst my three American readers may not know what I am talking about, my two English readers certainly do: the apparent suicide of the nurse who took the prank phone call from the two Australian DJs working for a radio station.

I might not be the only one in this country who smells the rancid odour of boundless emotionalism and political correctness here, but I have not managed to read anything reasonable on the matter until now. Therefore, I think it is fitting to do something awful here, and put a thing or two in their right place at the (welcome) risk of scandalising the usual suspects.

Firstly, a suicide is a horrible, horrible thing. A suicide puts the one who commits it in very great danger of damning his soul. In addition, a suicide irretrievably damages the lives of several people around the person who took his life. Moreover, a suicide encourages other people to commit suicide: suicidal people are rather gregarious, and a spike in suicides has been observed in the one-two days following “well-known” suicides, even if they are fictitious (say: on popular TV fiction programmes).

Every suicide helps other people to commit suicide; everyone who downplays the tragic reality of suicide does the same; you see here the logic of God’s creation, and the linearity of Satan’s work.

Secondly, every person with some sense will tell you the same that every sound doctor will repeat: suicides don’t just happen because of one disappointment. Something very bad has been going on for a very long time, and at some point the suicidal person “snaps” and something – something which might be very bad, or very trivial – tips the scales, and Satan very probably snatches that soul.

Thirdly, the thing no one says anymore in circumstances like this: the first person culpable of a suicide is always, always, always the suicide himself. And no, I do not care if this is seen as “insensitive”: to encourage further suicides through the all-too-common mellifluous wave of fake solidarity is much, much worse; but hey, people feel good, so those who feel suicidal are welcome to throw themselves from the next bridge, the next wave of sugary and smug solidarity is assured to them.

In past times – when people used to think, rather than to emote – all this was well understood. Suicides were not buried on consecrated ground, so that the horrified public may be able to give a good look at the abyss of hell. But the shiver they would get unavoidably helped them when the great tests of life came and the devil prowled around, seeking whom he might devour.

In these disgraceful times, however, people don’t “do” hell anymore, and every kind of sugary emotionalism is manna to them (that’s why they don’t believe in hell, by the way). Therefore, the terrible news of a mother of two hanging herself does not awaken any kind of sentiment concerning the immense stupidity and blasphemy of such a gesture, or considerations about what kind of depression might have been going on for who knows how long for something like that to happen. Rather, the public rage directs itself against two young people with a rather keen sense of humour, succeeding in a prank they had probably not even seriously planned and had certainly very innocently executed.

I herewith invite all those who have known of the prank against Sarah Palin and have not expressed the same kind of solidarity for her in 2008 to just do us the  favour and kindly shut up; and all the others, to express any kind of questioning of the opportunity of telephone pranks only after they have said the things that must be said concerning the great danger of damnation of those who commit suicide, and the fact that the responsibility for their act lies firstly, secondly and thirdly by the suicides themselves.

Every suicide is a bomb exploding under the chair of Christianity. It signals a probable victory for Satan at the same time as it prepares the next one, or the next ones. A Christian must abhor suicide as he abhors child raping. Suicide must go back to being what it used to be: a taboo that can’t be abused for the sake of easy emotionalism and feel-good sugary platitudes.

I wonder how many priests would say this today? Read your novels, and you’ll know this is what every clergymen, even the Protestant ones, would have told everyone only a handful of generations ago.

Christianity is slowing vanishing from Western culture, and is being replaced by a concoction of childish assumed wisdom and effeminate emotionalism.

Time to wake up, and no mistake.

Say your eternal rest for the poor woman, for the sake of her soul (if she has managed to save it, which we hope) and in honour of her poor guardian angel, ignored and never thanked like most of them are.

But never for an instant lose contact with the utterly terrifying reality of suicide, and of its very likely consequences.

Mundabor

Posted on December 8, 2012, in Catholicism and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Too true blue!
    Families’ names as reported looked portugese, hailing from the subcontinent, spells cradle catholic, but we must hope inthis case she had , working and living in secularized UK consciously lost her faith but , and thus pray, it came back in the final seconds twixt the act and its consequences, if I correctly remember a priest from way back when (1958-60odd)…..

    • Yes Pepe,

      sad as it is, this tragedy points out to either a secularised setting or a very grave form of depression finally ended up in a moment of unconscionable madness. I hope it was the last of course, but the secular environment makes your analysis more probable.

      Mother of two, too, for Pete’s sake…

      Mundabor

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