The Power of The Church

No one knew how to fly the F-18s.

No one knew how to fly the F-18s.

An interesting article in the online version of Crisis magazine points out to a rather self-evident, if not explicitly admitted, fact: the power and influence the Church still holds in very many Western Countries.

The relentless energy with which the Church is misrepresented or outright slandered from the media (“Daily Telegraph”, or should I say “Daily Homograph”, obviously not excluded) is a thinly
veiled admission the Church is still a thorn in the side of the heathens (I do not count the Protestants here; they are largely extinct and few of the survivors who believe in God will show her the hostility of, say, the aiders and abettors of child abusers at the BBC). They are, therefore, doing their best to present the Church as a shop which must either radically change or die (a bit like, well, erm… the BBC).

As so often when the dark forces of secularism open their mouth, nothing can be further from the truth.

Firstly, it isn’t that the Church can really “change”, and the worst a Pope can do is to water down and sabotage the teaching; but as to changing, this is just not going to happen because no Pope would be allowed to.

You can see, if you want, the Church of Christ as a huge block of granite. A bad Pope may attack the block of granite with a screwdriver;  have it painted all over if he thinks an aggiornamento is needed; wrap a pink ribbon around it to make it more “relevant”, and write over it all kind of shallow slogans to impress the masses. Still, at the end of all his efforts the block of granite, ridiculous as the bad Pope might make it look, would still have lost nothing of his substance, and we can hope that even if fewer people would feel awed by the block of granite, a vast number would still be fully aware of what lies behind the ribbon and the pink paint.

If these libtards knew how little a Pope can do for them, they would be rather scared.

Secondly, the article repeats a concept on which I insist with stubborn regularity: the Church is like a huge aircraft carrier with still – even after 50 years of very bad maintenance –  an immense power of devastation. Particularly so in a democracy, because – as I have tried to explain in the past – democracies are in fact organised according to the wishes of organised minorities, and the Church can rapidly become the mother of all pressure groups in almost all European countries, let alone the United States.  The Church is a giant on the world social scene, who has remained rather silent in the last fifty years because the Popes thought impolite (or uncharitable; or uncomfortable) to raise their voice.  They have, therefore, limited themselves to some words of counsel – beautiful words, generally – happily ignored by politicians as soon as it became clear – as it always does – that they can do no real harm.

There is no way the liberals will get a Pope even vaguely similar to what they want. Even if they were to get one tenth of what they want, they would criticise him incessantly because of the lack of the other nine tenths. “The Pope is Catholic” is a concept that must be brought to them slowly, and with great prudence.

Oh, how I would like a Pope stronger and readier to fight them than in their worst nightmare! The supreme irony would be if Cardinal Turkson were elected, with a “Black Pope” far more difficult to attack.

Or they might invent a “Nazi Past” for (in this scenario) Pope Turkson. “Impossible”, you will say; “they can’t invent such a story without any real basis, surely?”.

Of course they can! All seen already!

The liberals will be certainly disappointed by the new Pope, because it is impossible that the they aren’t if the Pope is to be Catholic.

But the question remains whether the new Pope will really start to see the Church as an aircraft carrier ready for action, or whether the aeroplanes’ wings will continue to gather dust.

Mundabor

Posted on February 17, 2013, in Catholicism and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off on The Power of The Church.

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