Daily Archives: May 28, 2013

French Lesson

Pour Le Mariage!

The French have staged another oceanic march against the abomination of so-called homosexual marriage. A march on that scale after the approval of the law is a clear indication that there are an awful lot of people who think it's time for the tough to get going. Monsieur (or I should say: Madame) Hollande is not in a good spot anyway, and he certainly doesn't need this. He might, in fact – unless the devil calls him to his HQ before the time – live to regret (and unless he repents, die to regret) what he has done.

What does the French example tell us? That whenever the perverts and their friends manage to have some legislative measure passed, we must not accept this as “a sign of the times” and resign to the new status quo, but rather start – everyone in our own little ways, and hopefully with the help of more organised structures in time – the fight against abomination now.

Abortion was taken away from the public spot for decades and considered, more or less, a given at least in vast parts of Europe, but the situation has now changed so much that even Pope Francis dares to speak against it. In the matter of Sodomarriage we must not wait for the next 40 years before reacting, but we must start reacting now. How probable success in our lifetime is, is utterly irrelevant, the all-decisive fact being that in this fight we are on Christ's side.

Which, incidentally, is also the winning one.

Mundabor

 

Searchlight Can’t See The Light

Wild Ass.


If you want to have a laugh, go on Father Ray Blake's blog and enjoy the press release sent to him about an imminent coup of the friends of Bishop Williamson, apparently ready to oust Bishop Fellay and, one must conclude, at least 80% of the Society. More, actually.

The problem with the stupid is that they can't think. If they can't think, they will publish whatever rubbish they think serves their cause, or at least gives them some notoriety; or slanders those they dislike.

These people obviously do not know how the Society is organised. If they knew, they would avoid making asses of themselves. But again, asses generally do not know they are making asses of themselves.

Enjoy the press release on Father Blake's blog.

Mundabor

 

My Dream Missal

We live in age of portable electronic devices. I can pray the Rosary on my tablet, access catechisms and countless devotions; but as I write, the 1962 Missal hasn't entered the electronic age.

This is even more striking, as the cost of a well-made 1962 Missal is certainly some obstacle to its diffusion, and the particular requirements of the paper – which must be extremely thin, but very robust – will take care these never become cheap articles.

Now let us imagine I sit in my pew, three minutes before the start of the (Traditional) Mass. What is today? Trinity Sunday. I click on the interactive, easy to access index or table of content and the mass of the day appears in front of my eyes.

I do not have to flip back and forth, as the app has arranged everything for me. I can choose whether I want my text in Latin only or with another language (English, French, & Co.) at the side. I decide whether to keep the tablet horizontal or vertical. I can even pick the type font of my choice, and the background colour. I can have a bigger text if I so prefer. I am not talking of amazing features here, merely of those I already have on other Catholic apps.

This would require extensive works of course, but the texts are all there already, and the usual publishing suspects have all prepared as I write. Such a work could be easily sold for a price that may appear high for a tablet app, but would strike one as cheap if compared with the original book; this, without considering the added advantage of tablet portability and, important, readability particularly for the elderly; plus, one would basically have his missal always with one.

The improvements and enrichments are also easy to imagine: hundreds of reproductions of sacred paintings could be inserted at the appropriate place (say: at the beginning of the Trinity Sunday Mass, a relevant masterpiece). Latin-Vernacular dictionaries could be added, & Co. Perhaps as optional modules, in collaboration with specialised publishing houses.

I can't imagine that a market would not be there, as a healthy market is already there for the expensive and less practical book product, with several choices already given to the buyer.

We shall see. The world of the tablet will not be ignored forever. When such a product come – properly made, of course – your humble correspondent will fork the money as an early adopter.

Mundabor

 

My Dream Missal

We live in age of portable electronic devices. I can pray the Rosary on my tablet, access catechisms and countless devotions; but as I write, the 1962 Missal hasn't entered the electronic age.

This is even more striking, as the cost of a well-made 1962 Missal is certainly some obstacle to its diffusion, and the particular requirements of the paper – which must be extremely thin, but very robust – will take care these never become cheap articles.

Now let us imagine I sit in my pew, three minutes before the start of the (Traditional) Mass. What is today? Trinity Sunday. I click on the interactive, easy to access index or table of content and the mass of the day appears in front of my eyes.

I do not have to flip back and forth, as the app has arranged everything for me. I can choose whether I want my text in Latin only or with another language (English, French, & Co.) at the side. I decide whether to keep the tablet horizontal or vertical. I can even pick the type font of my choice, and the background colour. I can have a bigger text if I so prefer. I am not talking of amazing features here, merely of those I already have on other Catholic apps.

This would require extensive works of course, but the texts are all there already, and the usual publishing suspects have all prepared as I write. Such a work could be easily sold for a price that may appear high for a tablet app, but would strike one as cheap if compared with the original book; this, without considering the added advantage of tablet portability and, important, readability particularly for the elderly; plus, one would basically have his missal always with one.

The improvements and enrichments are also easy to imagine: hundreds of reproductions of sacred paintings could be inserted at the appropriate place (say: at the beginning of the Trinity Sunday Mass, a relevant masterpiece). Latin-Vernacular dictionaries could be added, & Co. Perhaps as optional modules, in collaboration with specialised publishing houses.

I can't imagine that a market would not be there, as a healthy market is already there for the expensive and less practical book product, with several choices already given to the buyer.

We shall see. The world of the tablet will not be ignored forever. When such a product come – properly made, of course – your humble correspondent will fork the money as an early adopter.

Mundabor

 

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