God Bless Good Father Dickson

At times I read posts in blogs written by priests that are so good I am very tempted to report them here, and add some words of personal encouragement; but then I refrain from it, because I am afraid that this might, in time, attract the ire of their bishop once some parishioner of them (or not parishioner of them) complains said priest is lauded in “ultra-conservative Catholic blogs” of the (bbbrrr…) “SSPX type”. 

I make an exception this time for two reasons: the good priest in question keeps keeping me in his blog column (thus showing a remarkable, rather astonishing candor); and his blog is – from what I can see from the referrals to mine – growing so fast that if the good man has problems with the bishop it will certainly not be because of me, but because of the bigger and bigger audience his blog attracts.

Allow me, then, to show you what a blogger priest can write when he is really, really good.  Emphases in red mine.

A Liberal is one who seeks to change Church teaching or pastoral practice in order to accommodate the changing values of the world, such as artificial contraception, cohabitation and homosexual pairings. In reality they exchange the teaching of Christ for the theories of Rogers, Freud, Marx etc. Such a person has fallen into moral heresy, abandoning Gospel morality as taught for 2000 years under the guidance the Holy Spirit.
A Conservative is one who is loyal to Rome no matter what. Be they laity or prelates, they are blind ultramontanes; those who change their teaching and pastoral practice because Rome has said so –and without asking whether Rome was entitled to make the change. This form of ultramontanism is most dangerous because it appears loyal, but it is erroneous in that it is loyal only to the Pope of the day and not to the whole history of papal and Conciliar teaching.

A Traditionalist is one who is loyal to the Pope of the day as long as that Pope’s teaching is consistent with that of previous Popes and Councils. There can never be a ‘good Pope’ who changes doctrine or allows doctrine to be sidestepped for pastoral concerns, since doctrinal change is renunciation of previous teaching and a pastoral sidestep creates a lex vivendi which gives impetus to a change in the lex credendi. A Pope who changes doctrine or sidesteps it in practice cannot be a safe, good or loyal Pope, because his task is simply to defend and promote the Deposit of Faith. He may develop it in application to new situations, but he cannot distort it or discard it in order to accommodate new situations.

Another statement is absolutely brilliant, and what we very seldom hear from priests: 

Doctrinal change and/or pastoral sidestepping are what liberals expect of Pope Francis, and at the end of the day I cannot see him obliging them. Certainly some of his off-the-cuff remarks have given a hope to liberals and in that sense they are to be regretted, but unless he has the arrogance of assuming that for two thousand years the Church has been wrong; that he alone has correctly perceived the mind and will of God who is “the same yesterday, today and forever” (Heb.13:8) and in whom “there is no change, nor shadow of alteration” (Jas.1:17), Francis simply cannot oblige liberal desires.

There’s a lot here. I’ll leave this without comment. It’s just too beautiful.

May God richly bless this brave priest, and give him the richest reward when his time comes.

Mundabor

 

Posted on January 21, 2014, in Catholicism, Conservative Catholicism, Good Shepherds, Traditional Catholicism and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. And God bless New Catholic:
    http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2014/01/opinion-call-for-unity.html.
    “There is nothing stronger than an idea whose time has come.”
    Victor Hugo.

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