Lessons In Papacy

The one on the left is not Pius X.

The one on the right is not Pius X.

I wish Francis would dedicate some of the time he does not devote to hugging wheelchairs and talking nonsense “off-the cuff” to the reading of the writings of serious Popes of the past. 

If he did, he might at some point stumble on something like this:

But stranger still, alarming and saddening at the same time, are the audacity and frivolity of men who call themselves Catholics and dream of re-shaping society under such conditions, and of establishing on earth, over and beyond the pale of the Catholic Church, “the reign of love and justice” with workers coming from everywhere, of all religions and of no religion, with or without beliefs, so long as they forego what might divide them – their religious and philosophical convictions, and so long as they share what unites them – a “generous idealism and moral forces drawn from whence they can” When we consider the forces, knowledge, and supernatural virtues which are necessary to establish the Christian City, and the sufferings of millions of martyrs, and the light given by the Fathers and Doctors of the Church, and the self-sacrifice of all the heroes of charity, and a powerful hierarchy ordained in heaven, and the streams of Divine Grace – the whole having been built up, bound together, and impregnated by the life and spirit of Jesus Christ, the Wisdom of God, the Word made man – when we think, I say, of all this, it is frightening to behold new apostles eagerly attempting to do better by a common interchange of vague idealism and civic virtues. What are they going to produce? What is to come of this collaboration? A mere verbal and chimerical construction in which we shall see, glowing in a jumble, and in seductive confusion, the words Liberty, Justice, Fraternity, Love, Equality, and human exultation, all resting upon an ill-understood human dignity. It will be a tumultuous agitation, sterile for the end proposed, but which will benefit the less Utopian exploiters of the people.

This is from Pope St. Pius X’s letter to the French Bishops and Archbishops against the movement of the Sillon, “Our Apostolic Mandate”.

What can Francis learn from texts like this one? Let us see: 

1. No hot air anywhere. NO “walking here”, and “meeting there”, and “go to the crossroads”, and “smell like a sheep”, and all the other nonsense that does not explain the main thing: whether one will be Catholic once he has come to the crossroads, or will simply say “look at me: how social, inclusive, and smelly I am”. No childish comparisons, either. A stern and crystal clear language. 

2. Truth administered without hesitation, and without compromise. Already the statement: “it is frightening to behold new apostles eagerly attempting to do better by a common interchange of vague idealism and civic virtues” makes a massacre of 99% of Francis’ utterances since that fateful day almost one year ago.

3. The clear statement that you start from the Truth and use it to judge whether the slogans of men are or are not valid. If, on the other hand, the premises are wrong, then the entire thinking will be wrong. The result?: “A mere verbal and chimerical construction in which we shall see, glowing in a jumble, and in seductive confusion, the words Liberty, Justice, Fraternity, Love, Equality, and human exultation, all resting upon an ill-understood human dignity”. Francis has his fundamentals wrong. He is full of an earthly (populist, and rather resentful) ideology and tries to adjust Catholicism to it. He makes exactly the mistake Pope St. Pius X is lamenting. 

4. Statements written for adults. Longish periods, rich in subordinates. Statements requiring one to think rather than emote. A writing style that makes clear the reader has the responsibility to attentively absorb what the Pope is saying, rather than showing the reader how well the Pope has absorbed the stupidity of the world. Can you imagine the author of the statement above saying “who am I to judge” when confronted with a sodomite as close collaborator?

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There are no excuses for a bad Pope. Even a slow-witted, ill-instructed Pope could and should lock himself in his study and absorb from the great Popes of the past and the immense, invaluable patrimony they have left us the proper way to act and express himself like a Pope; asking his speech-writers to elaborate with modern examples on the concept already beautifully expressed by them, and following their lead in their understanding of Church Tradition and the  Fathers.

The great Popes of the past have lessons in papacy available to every Pope for free, at the only cost of a touch of… humility.

Francis does not think he needs any lesson. He thinks he can make everything new. He thinks he can build his own papacy on the chimerical construction lamented by his great predecessor.  Let us recall Pius X’s words about:

“the audacity and frivolity of men who call themselves Catholics and dream of re-shaping society under such conditions, and of establishing on earth, over and beyond the pale of the Catholic Church, “the reign of love and justice” with workers coming from everywhere, of all religions and of no religion, with or without beliefs, so long as they forego what might divide them – their religious and philosophical convictions, and so long as they share what unites them – a “generous idealism and moral forces drawn from whence they can”

Add heresy to the above mentioned statement, and what you have is pure Francis. 

Mundabor

Posted on February 15, 2014, in Catholicism, Conservative Catholicism, Traditional Catholicism and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Awesome M. One of the things I have come to realize since the beginning of this disgraced papacy, is to much better appreciate what previous holy Popes have told us. The contrast between Bergoglio and St. Pius X is just phenomenal. Please, keep this kind of posts coming; we will greatly benefit from them!

    • Thanks, Olga.
      Very true, through the falseness one discovers the Truth.

      On a personal note, I started “confronting” Catholicism (I was a alpsed Catholic of the V Ii generation) when I moved to England and discovered how godless this country is. Slowly I became curious to read more about my own, very neglected religion. The Internet helped me to find traditional books, books with real content instead of the fluffy hot air of the V II propaganda. Then I started attending Mass again (no communion), then when I found courage a general confession came; then, tears of joy.

      M

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