Daily Archives: August 8, 2014

Has God Forsaken Us?

No. He hasn't.

No. He hasn’t.

 

The Pope goes around saying things that, had they been said by Popes of a Christian past, would have probably caused him to die at the stake, and deservedly so. Bishops and Cardinals everywhere undermine Catholic teaching at every possible and impossible occasion. Many a Mass raises valid questions whether a valid consecration has taken place. Catholicism among the masses has degenerated to a very short list of the most trite banalities; banalities in which nowadays open denial of God’s rules is automatically contained; like the “inclusiveness” that ends up accepting adultery and sexual perversion, and the “social justice” that forgets that justice is not of this world.

Has God, then, forgotten us? Has he left us alone in the midst of wolves who attack us day in and day out, and demand that we “include” them, embrace their ideology, and accept it as True Faith?

It is, at times, seriously sickening to always have to write about the latest Papal scandal; or the latest bishop or cardinal desirous to earn brownie points by him; or the latest priest thinking that Castro has been sent by God like a new prophet.

It is sickening. But it is our lot. Could be worse, frankly.

Had God forsaken humanity when the Arian heresy had swept away almost all of Christianity? What must the faithful have thought during the many decades of its seemingly irresistible ascendancy? When even the Pope was at the very least their unwilling accomplice, and at the worst their willing one?

Had God forsaken humanity when the Plague swept Europe in 1348; ravaging a Continent with a violence never seen before, carrying to an early grave countless people, and destroying entire families?

Had God forsaken Europe when the Thirty Years’ War left almost all of Europe savagely ravaged, and Germany almost destroyed, with only the introduction of the potato saving them from countless further deaths of starvation?

Shall I remind you of the First World War, which was in these days, one hundred years ago, about to engulf Europe in a conflict the like of which humanity had never seen? Followed, just as the war had ended, by a short but terrible wave of disease which made, in a matter of weeks, even more victims again?

Last but not least: has God forsaken the countless Christians all over the East and the Middle East, and whose tragedy is now under our eyes – the eyes of those who want to see, that is – as it unfolds week after horrible week?

God never forsakes us, and His promise to be with us to the end of times will obviously stay. But we have to face our lot bravely; strong in this promise, as so many generations have done before us; living and dying in faith amidst the apparence of a crumbling world; and thinking, as we do so, of all those whose suffering has in these disgraceful times a much more concrete dimension than our rather comfortable complaint about probably the worst Pope in history, bar none.

Past generations had to deal with the Arians and the plague; with war, famine and disease. Eastern Christians have to deal with ruthless Muslim persecution, most evidently in Syria and Iraq but also elsewhere, and with discrimination as daily normality in many other Countries.

We have to deal with an old deluded atheist – and if you ask me, an old filthy man, for whom to live under an homosexual’s roof and to openly protect and promote him is being just hip and progressive – as Pope, spreading heresies from the very top as he undermines Catholic teaching every day; and with his minions, rivalling each other in their eagerness to establish who is the one who toadies to him the most.

God has not forsaken us, or the persecuted Christians in Mosul and elsewhere, just as he never forsook all the Christians who had to endure terrible suffering in the past.

We must soldier on in His name whatever He allows that it should happen to us, and draw from it the energy to live a live stronger in faith and, therefore, better able to endure the trials, and better suited to stay, one day, in front of our judge.

Mundabor

 

 

Give Us The Bastards Back

Hafez al-Assad.  We need people like him, and on the right side.

Hafez al-Assad.
We need people like him, and on the right side.

 

 

This is not going to please many of you, but I think in these days of atrocious persecution of Christians in Muslim Countries there are a thing or two that must be said without half words.

The Arab democratic experiment – an experiment which I had initially greeted, considering the Iraqis far better than they proved to be – has failed. It has failed so appallingly, that we are now in front of an entire region utterly desirous to sink into a pit of bloody ferociousness, as clearly seen in those Countries where they managed to do so; whilst only clearly non democratic regimes – like in Egypt, or in Saudi Arabia – can still control the mob.

The question remains whether in those prevalently Muslim Middle east Countries people are Muslims because they are savages, or are savages because they are Muslims. I tend for the second, seen that the Christian minorities present in many of those Countries do not show the same, ahem, character traits. But in the end, the conclusion is the same: you can’t throw pearls before swines, or democracies before Arabs. I once thought it was possible. I saluted GWB’s attempt to change the world for the better, in deed for once rather than just with stupid rhetoric. But now I am cured.

I see, at this point, only three possible outcomes.

1. The Muslims keep massacring each other, and the worst among them keep massacring Christians like it’s Turkey Shooting Day. The West whines, and does nothing. The Pope, the President of the United States and the main Western leaders talk of peace in a tired manner, whilst the massacre goes on undisturbed.

2. The US and their allies decide to act, and start bombing the ISIS villages and installations like it’s Doomsday, making clear that anywhere near a possible ISIS target – real, potential, or simply suspected – is the wrong place to be and not conducive to a long life, and that the dear supporters of the Religion of Peace will have to extirpate the cancer from their midst with their own hands if they want the bombs to stop falling. Still: that in the end a definitive victory will not be possible without boots on the ground all those of you who have read three things about military strategy know all too well for me to bore them.

I really can’t see any other way, and question the grasp of reality of all those who think otherwise. Talking of peace with the ISIS is, if possible, even more senseless than talking of religion with Stalin. When they die, they will get the message. Not one second before.

But then we have to ask ourselves how the West – if the West is smart; which it isn’t – is to deal with the region.

My solution is not very idealistic, but very practical: bomb the bastards as needed, and then put in power a handful of your bastards. People who know what they must do to stay alive and enjoy a life of luxury and privilege.

Forget democracy, progress, civilisation. They clearly haven’t deserved it. They can’t deal with it. It is what it is.

Put there a handful of bastards able to speak the only language that counts in those parts – violence – and take care that they do not touch your own interests, starting from the safety and tranquility of the Christians. If they deliver, they will be allowed to live, and the West will close its rhetorical and democratic eye whenever necessary. If they don’t, they’ll end up as dead as Gaddafi whilst the next bastard gets his chance.

In the Middle East, Realpolitik is the only option, because every so little amount of practised idealism leads to suffering without end.

Violence, fear, and the constant threat of the Western wrath. This is what works with them. They react to it rather well (Saddam docet). Give it to them, then.

And please, don’t give me the next “give peace a chance” song whilst another Christian community is dispossessed. Diplomacy isn’t made in the kindergarten, and reality has a terrible way of reminding us what happens if we do. Obama’s support to the revolts in Egypt, Libya, even Syria is the epitome of diplomatic and humanitarian suicide for the sake of the kindergarten.

Let us get back to sound diplomacy. Our bastards everywhere, and woe to them if they touch our interests. This is what works.

Can’t you see with your eyes that this is the only way with these people? The “religion of peace” makes it impossible for them to avoid massacring each other and massacre other people, unless they are either united by a common enemy or under a man ferocious enough to keep them quiet.

Give war a chance. Give violence a chance. Give fear a chance.

In the Middle East, it is the only way. 

Mundabor

 

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