Offending The Bouncer

One day, he could be Pope.

A night-club bouncer. One day, he could be Pope…

 

The extent of the delusion of The Most Astonishing Hypocrite In Church History (TMAHICH), and at the same time his complete lack of interest in orthodoxy (or Catholicism, come to that) emerges very clearly from an article published by the “Catholic Herald”. The article, signed “staff reporter”, is probably not meant to contain any condemnation, and appears merely a sort of relata refero.

As, therefore, there is not one word of comment, your humble correspondent will have to supply it. Let us see what this genius has given us this time:

Speaking to the gathered bishops he said the faithful must not keep things back just because they might be worried “what will the Pope think”, according to Catholic News Service.

Bad news for Francis: if he is not aligned with what Christ thinks, what he thinks does not interest a dry fig to anyone who cares for his own salvation. It is beyond belief that at a gathering of prelates meant to deal with the Holy Sacrament of the Eucharist and the danger of desecration, the Pope himself should tell the present they should not be worried to offend… him. It reminds one of another humble, classy Argentinian: Diego Maradona.

Heavens, you could dance the tango in front of the altar, under his very eyes, and this man would not be offended in the least! We have to deal with a former nightclub bouncer here, ladies and gentlemen. Last time I looked, they weren’t quite the sensitive flowers.

“Speak clearly. Don’t tell anyone, ‘you can’t say that’,” he added.

“Aaahh”, says Mundabor, “this here is a clear variation of Francispeak!”

Francispeak ( ® Mundabor 2013) is a way of making two opposite, but seemingly connected statements, where one of the statements is meant to “wash” the other, and let it pass through the customs instead of being condemned, as it would have happened if Francis0 had said it in isolation.

Here, he starts saying “speak clearly!” What a beautiful exhortation, Bishop! This is a very positive quality! Clarity. What a beautiful thing to have. What’s not to like?

But then he attaches to it an extremely grave statement: “Don’t tell anyone, ‘you can’t say that’ “

Why on earth not? Isn’t it supposed to be his darn job? And the Pope’s, to start with?

But you see, once the pleasant flavour of “speak clearly” has been introduced, suddenly the impious act of letting everyone say what he pleases assumes a positive connotation; unfortunately, heresy must not be allowed so that clarity be preserved. You would think a Pope should know that?

And so we have it: the man doesn’t care a straw if heretical talking takes place. He positively encourages it. The important thing is that he, in his nightclub-trained charity and greatness, is… not offended himself!

Stuff the Cross. Just mind you don’t offend a former bouncer.

I could end here, but I do not want to leave the last pearl untouched:

“the spirit of collegiality is to speak boldly and to listen with humility”

Last time I looked boldness was one thing, and heresy quite another. Luther was, no doubt, bold. But the greatness of his boldness somewhat escapes me. Once again, the man takes an adverb (“boldly”, as before “clearly”) and then lets this positive adverb vouch for the goodness of something that is entirely negative, and pretty much the same in both cases: staying silent in front of heresy and scandalous talk from a prelate.

One understands, does one not, why there are no minutes and no description of individual interventions, with names and surnames attached to them? What must go on over there must be pure heresy; a full-fronted attack on orthodoxy, on Christ, on the Cross, on the Sacraments, on everything we hold sacred. And in my eyes the aim is not even to have them sanctioned now, but to have them floated around and slowly spread among the people in the next twelve months, when the real attack will be unleashed.

As I have already written, once these things have been floated around “collectively”, the taboo is far more easily broken. The Bishop will give an interview and state something on the line of “at the Synod, there were several voices stating (it follows an outlandish heresy). I was initially taken aback, you know. But certainly, we must find ways to be ohsokindandmercifultoeveryfreakingidiotwhowantstohavehiscakeandeatit. How can we do it? Yes, I think we might, we could, we should have this discussion”.

Little by little, the heresy can be introduced to the ear of the people; merely as an idea at first, nothing more than brainstorming; then, a remote possibility; then, a concrete possibility; and in the end, a new reality.

All this, remote-controlled by TMAHICH as he goes around embracing wheelchairs, and praising his own humility to the skies.

If I didn’t know he is the Pope, I would almost think he is a Jesuit.

Mundabor

 

 

 

Posted on October 12, 2014, in Traditional Catholicism. Bookmark the permalink. 7 Comments.

  1. I was suspended (permanently) from Twitter when I wrote that if young Bergoglio ever really was a bouncer in a bar, it must have been a gay bar. A bouncer generally must be able to do more than one pushup, after all.

    It also would be great if bishops were also required to have been able at some point in their entire life to have done more than one pushup. That would have prevented Cupich from being in power now.

    Btw, hopefully you know that Cupich played the race card to help Obama get elected in 2008. He wrote an article in America implying that voting against Obama was “racist” and so supposedly people shouldn’t be very upset that Obama was the Senate’s biggest abortion-lover.

    • I will retwitter my blog post again. Let’s see if I get suspended.

      Who “suspends” from twitter anyway?

      Are there alternative instruments?

      As to the gay bar, I doubt there were “gay bar” at all in the Fifties.

      What I think it rather happened is that they worked in two: good uncle and bad uncle. Good uncle can talk and minimise conflict, and with his non-threatening appearance is apt to de-escalate; bad uncle is there for the added muscle and the enforcement…

      M

  2. M., The White Swan was in operation in London in 1812 where the Reverend John Church performed marriages of sodomites. The Cave of the Golden Calf was another 19th century tavern where they gathered. In Holland they gathered at Het Mandje.

  3. So you see, there is nothing new under the sun. I imagine there were many bath houses and drinking establishments in Ancient Rome for that express purpose. Buenos Aries must have had a subculture in Bergoglios youth.

    • Yes. But a “gay club”, so under the sun? Would it not have been closed by the authorities? London and Holland were largely or in part Protestant.
      I mean, it might have happened. But it seems outlandish to me.
      by the by, contrary to popular belief, the Romans abhorred homosexuality and punished it, at least officially (I don’t think there was much enforcement), with death still in the time of Caesar. Caesar’s enemies tried to destroy his career spreading the rumour – whilst he was abroad in the Orient – that he was homosexual. He came back and proved quite the casanova (ante litteram). The rumours ended.
      M

  4. Who are the censors who suspend people from Twitter? It’s my firm belief that all of the biggest sites (Facebook, Twitter, AOL, etc) hire brainless twenty-something recent graduates with politically-correct degrees such as in [OppressedVictim] Studies. To them, the white Christian male is the hated enemy – and the usual double standards apply.

    So I was suspended from Twitter (that wasn’t the first site, by far) and they wouldn’t answer my emails asking why. Only people with a large following get a review and apology. Anyway, getting banned from such places is like a badge of honor. I could easily get a new account but things are dull at Twitter.

    • I fully agree with you.
      Way overrated.
      I only tweet there the blog post I have written, but do not go there anymore.
      Catholic information is available, when one is a bit organised, in far better way with some good news aggregator and a list of “favourites”.
      M

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