Final Report 84-86: The Text And Commentary.

84. The baptized who are divorced and civilly remarried are to be more integrated in the Christian communities in the various possible ways, avoiding every occasion of scandal.
The logic of integration is the key to their pastoral accompaniment, so that they be aware not only that they belong to the Body of Christ, that is the Church, but that they may have a joyful and fruitful experience. They are baptized, they are brothers and sisters, the Holy Spirit pours gifts and charisms in them for the good of all. Their participation can be expressed in various ecclesial services: it is therefore necessary to discern which of the different forms of exclusion currently practiced in a liturgical, educational, pastoral, and institutional role that can be overcome. They should not only not feel excommunicated, but they should live and mature as living members of the Church, feeling her as a mother that welcomes them always, takes care of them affectionately, and encourages them on the path of life and Gospel. This integration is necessary for the Christian care and education of their children, who must be considered what is most important. For the Christian community, taking care of these persons is not a weakening of their own faith and testimony regarding matrimonial indissolubility: rather, the Church expresses precisely in this care her charity.
85. Saint John Paul II offered an all-encompassing criterion, that remains the basis for valuation of these situations: “Pastors must know that, for the sake of truth, they are obliged to exercise careful discernment of situations. There is in fact a difference between those who have sincerely tried to save their first marriage and have been unjustly abandoned, and those who through their own grave fault have destroyed a canonically valid marriage. Finally, there are those who have entered into a second union for the sake of the children’s upbringing, and who are sometimes subjectively certain in conscience that their previous and irreparably destroyed marriage had never been valid.” (FC, 84) It is therefore a duty of the priests to accompany the interested parties on the path of discernment according to the teaching of the Church and the orientations of the Bishop. In this process, it will be useful to make an examination of conscience, by way of moments of reflection and repentance. Remarried divorcees should ask themselves how they behaved themselves when their conjugal union entered in crisis; if there were attempts at reconciliation; what is the situation of the abandoned partner [“partner” in the original Italian]; what consequences the new relationship has on the rest of the family and in the community of the faithful; what example does it offer to young people who are to prepare themselves to matrimony. A sincere reflection may reinforce trust in the mercy of God that is not denied to anyone.
Additionally, it cannot be denied that in some circumstances, “the imputability and the responsibility for an action can be diminished or annulled (CIC, 1735) due to various conditioners. Consequently, the judgment on an objective situation should lead to the judgment on a ‘subjective imputability'” (Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts, Declaration of June 24, 2000, 2a). In determined circumstances, the persons find great difficulty with acting in a different way. Therefore, while holding up a general rule, it is necessary to recognize that the responsibility regarding specific actions or decisions is not the same in every case. Pastoral discernment, while taking into account the rightly formed conscience of persons, should take these situations into account. Also the consequences of the accomplished acts are not necessarily the same in every case.
86. The path of accompaniment and discernment orients these faithful to becoming conscious of their situation before God. The conversation with the priest, in internal forum, concurs to the formation of a correct judgment on what prevents the possibility of fuller participation in the life of the Church and on the steps that may favor it and make it grow. Considering that in the same law there is no graduality (cf. FC, 34), this discernment must never disregard the demands of truth and charity of the Gospel proposed by the Church. In order for this to happen, the necessary conditions of humility, reserve, love for the Church and to her teaching, in the sincere search for the will of God and for the desire to reach a more perfect answer to the latter, are to be guaranteed.
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Then, the analysis, for what I can discern. This will be done by giving to the text what I find the obvious orthodox meaning of the phrases. We do not read ecclesiastical texts with the mind of a heretic, because we aren’t heretics. For a heretic, “do not judge” is enough to start a heresy.
84. The baptized who are divorced and civilly remarried are to be more integrated in the Christian communities in the various possible ways [let’s integrate whenever possible; let’s also draw a line in the sand, because we aren’t the freaking Presbyterians; hence, “possible” ways], avoiding every occasion of scandal [this “frames” the discussion: every occasion of scandal is to be avoided. All that follows must be read within this frame. This is how you read a text in its context, because you aren’t a heretic].
The logic of integration is the key to their pastoral accompaniment [the priest wants you to go back to the fold], so that they be aware not only that they belong to the Body of Christ, that is the Church, but that they may have a joyful and fruitful experience [hey, we aren’t torturing you here: chastity also means living a better life]. They are baptized, they are brothers and sisters, the Holy Spirit pours gifts and charisms in them for the good of all. [ they aren’t heathens. They have obligations coming from their baptism, but also the graces that come with it. It’s not that help from heaven is not available, if they ask]. Their participation can be expressed in various ecclesial services: it is therefore necessary to discern which of the different forms of exclusion currently practiced in a liturgical, educational, pastoral, and institutional role that can be overcome. [there must be no scandal; but by all means, dear priest; whatever can be done, please do. It is meritorious for the adulterer to even clean the toilets of the chancery. Whatever can be done, by all means. Whatever can’t be done, tough shit; see above, “avoiding every occasion of scandal”]. They should not only not feel excommunicated [no, they aren’t excommunicated], but they should live and mature as living members of the Church [you got to mature, which means grow, which means change; you are now immature, and not ready], feeling her as a mother that welcomes them always [ do not go around saying that the Church excludes you: it’s you who have excluded yourself), takes care of them affectionately [ mama is always ready to take you back], and encourages them on the path of life and Gospel [but mama does not simply meet you “where you are”. Mama wants you to follow the path and life of the Gospel; so no excuses, please]. This integration is necessary for the Christian care and education of their children, who must be considered what is most important [Do not even think that you can call yourself “out” and neglect the Catholic education of your children!]. For the Christian community, taking care of these persons is not a weakening of their own faith and testimony regarding matrimonial indissolubility [we take care of you; we invite you on the path to repentance; but hey, we will not allow scandal be given, see above]: rather, the Church expresses precisely in this care her charity [because you see, in doing so we are being truly charitable].
85. Saint John Paul II offered an all-encompassing criterion, that remains the basis for valuation of these situations: “Pastors must know that, for the sake of truth, they are obliged to exercise careful discernment of situations. There is in fact a difference between those who have sincerely tried to save their first marriage and have been unjustly abandoned, and those who through their own grave fault have destroyed a canonically valid marriage. Finally, there are those who have entered into a second union for the sake of the children’s upbringing, and who are sometimes subjectively certain in conscience that their previous and irreparably destroyed marriage had never been valid.” (FC, 84) [ we omit here to mention the following paragraphs, because we are wussies; but you know they are there, and we are not in the least saying they are now overcome by a new discipline; so no, Mr Heretic, this will not wash]. It is therefore a duty of the priests to accompany the interested parties on the path of discernment [ the priest will have time for you…] according to the teaching of the Church [… but know that he will not create a new religion for you] and the orientations of the Bishop [this is the worst and wussiest paragraph of all, I know. But we are Catholic bishops, and cannot write a text assuming that the bishop is a heretic. The bishop can only think as the church does. That’s the only way the Church can work. Nor can the bishop give scandal, etc.]. In this process, it will be useful to make an examination of conscience, by way of moments of reflection and repentance [dear adulterer, reflect that the problem it’s you sleeping on the wrong mattress here; not the Church being “cruel”]. Remarried divorcees should ask themselves how they behaved themselves when their conjugal union entered in crisis; if there were attempts at reconciliation; what is the situation of the abandoned partner [“partner” in the original Italian]; what consequences the new relationship has on the rest of the family and in the community of the faithful; what example does it offer to young people who are to prepare themselves to matrimony. [ We differentiate, but we aren’t blind. Let’s make a comparison with Nazism. We know that every Nazi is not Hitler. You also have the Doenitzes and Raeders. You may even have the occasional Speer and Rommel. There are fifty shades of Nazi. But Nazis they all still are]. A sincere reflection may reinforce trust in the mercy of God that is not denied to anyone [reflect sincerely on your sins, and also realise that God is merciful to those who repent].
Additionally, it cannot be denied that in some circumstances, “the imputability and the responsibility for an action can be diminished or annulled (CIC, 1735) due to various conditioners [we are wussies here again, and therefore we repeat a general concept of criminal law worldwide, and of ecclesiastical law besides, that you already know, just because it sounds good. It’s also in the CCC. But no one ever said you can use it to receive communion. So nice try again, but this won’t wash, either]. Consequently, the judgment on an objective situation should lead to the judgment on a ‘subjective imputability'” (Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts, Declaration of June 24, 2000, 2a). [ that’s again a general principle, a way to interpret legislative texts; it is also in all juridical systems; for example, if you are not compos mentis, you are not subjectively imputable, etc.] In determined circumstances, the persons find great difficulty with acting in a different way [see, I am not saying it will be easy to “act in a different way” and leave your concubine]. Therefore, while holding up a general rule […but do not think that I will throw away the rule just because of this! Remember, there is a general rule! I am repeating it here just in case you think I have forgotten it!], it is necessary to recognize that the responsibility regarding specific actions or decisions is not the same in every case [No, it isn’t. It can never be. It’s another general principle. You may be less culpable than another. Not all adulterers are the same. We all know that.] Pastoral discernment, while taking into account the rightly formed conscience of persons [there can be no discernment without a rightly formed conscience, so first know what it is expected from you and then talk], should take these situations into account [and be assured I will not treat you like the serial rapist who left his wife]. Also the consequences of the accomplished acts are not necessarily the same in every case [no they aren’t. Some beat their wives to almost death. Some go away with a motorbiker. Some are just very stupid. Some are cock-driven. All are adulterers.].
86. The path of accompaniment and discernment orients these faithful to becoming conscious of their situation before God. [ in case you don’t get it, I repeat it once again: you must realise that you are in mortal sin. I am just too much of a wussie to tell you so, but you get my drift all right] The conversation with the priest, in internal forum, concurs to the formation of a correct judgment [once your conscience is well formed, you can form a correct judgment on your situation and know in your heart that you are in mortal sin…] on what prevents the possibility of fuller participation in the life of the Church [… which is exactly what prevents you from receiving communion] and on the steps that may favor it and make it grow [ = abandon the situation of adultery. I know, it’s hard. Tough shit again. See above, “no scandal”]. Considering that in the same law there is no graduality (cf. FC, 34), [do not even think of applying the dratted graduality here: you leave your concubine, and that’s that] this discernment must never disregard the demands of truth and charity of the Gospel proposed by the Church [truth and charity of the Gospel as proposed by the Gospel are what counts. Your discernment must discern exactly this. Unless you discern this, you are not discerning. Stuff Cupich.] In order for this to happen [ in order for you to get to think in the right way], the necessary conditions of humility,[ the Church is not wrong; you are] reserve [ do not go around saying that you are shacking up, because you give scandal; which is an “upgrade” from Bormann to Hitler, see above], love for the Church and to her teaching [you must love the Church and her teacfhing; then you start to get it right; it’s your bitchy attitude that is the problem], in the sincere search for the will of God [you must forget what is convenient for you, and think of what God wants for you] and for the desire to reach a more perfect answer to the latter, are to be guaranteed [if you do not do all of this, you are wasting your priest’s time; but the priest will always be there for you if you do].

Oh well, that was long.

It’s very late, and I am very tired.
I hope this helps.
M
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Posted on October 25, 2015, in Traditional Catholicism. Bookmark the permalink. 12 Comments.

  1. Yeah, it helped. Thanks, M.

  2. This is of immense help, Mr. Mundabor. Beautifully done and thank you.

    Have a hot supper and a good rest. Both so richly deserved!

    • Ha!
      It’s 1 am in the morning, ma’am! Actually I think it’s 2, or midnight, or it will soon be, because we have the switch!
      Thanks for your kind words.
      Going to sleep now.
      Please Lord, let me dream of Pius XIII…
      M

  3. Did your commentary help? Oh, yes…and with much better clarity than was published by the Synod. I started and stopped reading 84-86 a couple different times on other websites. But I only made it through them after reading your clarifications. Until then, there was darkness all around me! Thank you…

    You should wade through all 100 or so pages, clarify what was said and then issue “M’s Guide to Understanding Your New Synodal Catholic Church”.

    Heck…I might even buy two copies myself.

    • Dave, the point is that the text is weak, but clear, and every Catholics who read it as Catholic will know what it means. But the text must be read as a Catholic would, instead of trying to guess what a heretic will try to make of them.

      The texts also do not endorse any “Synodal catholic Church” (at least in what I have read); if you go looking in them what they do not say it is no surprise you ahve “darkness all around you”…
      M

    • Point taken, and Thank you. I don’t write flippancy very well and it’s obvious…too serious a matter anyway.

  4. Good morning Mundabor and I recently had supper and I hope I don’t get a stomachache as I have read your article and I really appreciate your efforts in instructing us. I agree with you on section 85 where you describe that paragraph as the “worst and wussiest”. I agree with you in a way that the orientations of the bishops should be based on the teachings of the Church. I see that the orientations (by the bishops) will be based on “pastoral reasons” and they will in the end justify communion for remarried persons (with no annulment). I think Bishops will not act on their own on this matter but guided by the individual episcopal conferences they belong to and therefore will obtain more power. There is a lot to comment and laugh but I better wait to read the translation of this document in Spanish if there is one Again, great job Mundabor!

    • Ah, but to do so the episcopal conferences will have to get doctrinal powers that they cannot have. The document does not mention them, at least according to what has been unearthed by now.
      We are now in front of a Crusade to avoid the “spirit of Francis church” covering all us in guano. That is, I think, the greatest danger now.
      M

  5. Great analysis. I’m so sorry that I live in this era. The bright side is that there are still heroes, perhaps even more than usual. God sees all and will never abandon those who fight for him. Never forget that, whatever happens.

  6. Once when you read a report (or encyclical) coming from the Vatican you disn’t need to be a Catholic to understand what was written down. Now you need a special “hermeneutic” of sorts to make things fit what and where you want them to fit. even if you’re a Catholic (whatecìver “catholic” may mean these days. And this is supposed to be Catholicism? No way! Sia Lodato Gesù Cristo!. .

    • Yeah, it’s very “sentitively” expressed. But the meaning is clear enough. Together, alas, with the intention of making this meaning as little damaging as they could to those who should have been damaged, the Pope first.
      M

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