Blog Archives

“Pro Missa Tridentina” Website and the progress of Summorum Pontificum in the German speaking dioceses.

Coming soon to a church near you

Curious to see how things are going with Summorum Pontificum outside of Blighty, I found the Pro Missa Tridentina website. This website has been established by Catholic laymen (I have already written here about the fact that the Catholic Renaissance on the Internet is nowadays driven by the laity, this is another beautiful example) and has the purpose of, inter alia, providing a listing of all regular Tridentine Masses being celebrated in and around the German speaking dioceses in Europe. You will find the list under the “Hl. Messen” (“Heilige Messen”, “Holy Masses”) link.

In the German speaking world the recovery of the Latin Mass seems to be more advanced than in the United Kingdom. Not only there are regions with a predictably high concentration of Tridentine Masses (Bavaria is a small paradise, it would seem that everyone with a car doesn’t even need to be much concerned about fuel costs….), but even the number of Masses available in Austria was – considering the liberal infestation of many of its dioceses – largely above my expectations. The small German speaking Belgian minority is also provided with Latin Masses and even in the once-schismatic Dutch Church the Tridentine Mass is slowly but surely coming back.

I have written in the past about the fact that Latin was meant to be, up to the beginning of V II (Veterum Sapientia), the basis of Catholic liturgy and that the subversion of its role is one of the poisoned fruits of the Bugnini-poisoned years which followed. I see in the resurgence of the Latin Mass (we are talking Tridentine here, not even Latin versions of the Novus Ordo) a continuation of the same mentality informing Veterum Sapientia, a brilliant document and probably one of the most neglected and most rapidly forgotten in the entire history of the Church.

The addresses and postcodes make it very easy to locate a Tridentine Mass for non-German speakers who are in the region for business or holiday. Even without any concrete need for a Tridentine Mass it might be useful to browse and get an idea of what is happening, I found it encouraging and a much needed bit of good news. This is, of course, only the beginning and the very existence of Internet websites allowing one to locate a Tridentine Mass shows how far we still are from an acceptable situation. Still, I couldn’t scroll down the list of the churches offering the Tridentine Mass and escape a feeling that we are now at the turning of the tide. The statistical section allows one to follow the progress of the reintroduction of the TLM.

My hat goes off to the laymen who had the initiative and courage to organise such an Internet presence (starting before Summorum Pontificum, mind) and make of it a useful instrument of the “reform of the reform” now slowly but surely underway.

Mundabor

Advertisements