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Terry Jones Is Not a Genius But He Certainly Has a Point, Part II

Yes, it's a Koran

 

After Jones’ burning exercise, UN workers have been attacked and several of them killed in Mazar-i-Sharif, a city in northern Afghanistan.

There are several considerations to be made here:

1) The freedom of Terry Jones to burn however many Korans he wants to burn must not be put into question: I have already made this point in the previous message, but repetita iuvant.

2) The cause of the killings is very obviously – though I am sure people of slow intelligence will not get this – not Terry Jones burning the Koran, but the existence of fanatical muslims ready to take every excuse to kill people.

3) What has happened in Mazar-i-Sharif not only cannot be blamed on Jones, but makes his point in the most impressive manner.

Please listen to this interview with ABC. The rather cretinous journalist continues to pose suggestive questions to Jones, all the whilst exhibiting the most sanctimonious of tones. Jones answers to them simply like one who has nothing to do with the killings, and condemns these animals. When the sanctimonious lady throws the mask and poses the question openly (whining tone, oh so virtuous): “do you fe-eel res-po-on-si-ble?” he clearly answers that he isn’t; when she asks “how wou-ou-ld you fe-el” if someone burned a bible he gives her a lesson in democracy and civilisation; when she says to him that he “en-c-couraged” the killing (an astonishing affirmation, this, not only factually wrong but showing a breathtaking illiberal bias) Jones again keeps calm (kudos to him; I could never have achieved that) and repeats his “Islam is dangerous, see events in Afghanistan” point.

And in fact, the man is perfectly right in this: that the koran burning exercise is juts the last excuse for something fanatics want to do in the first place. You want proof?

1) Even the most moronic islamic fanatic can go on youtube and delight himself with Koran burning galore. I have already pointed out in the past to the fact that on Youtube, “every day is burn a Koran day”. Why do the chaps wake up only today? Where have they been all the time? The videos have been on youtube for years and there are many more where they come from……

2) I am not aware of any islamic fanatic ever being short or reasons why he should behave like a fanatic. If it’s not the burning of Koran it is the threat to burn Korans; if it’s not the threat to burn Korans it is a cartoon about their most famous child rapist, Mohammed; if it’s not Mohammed, the child rapist it’s the invasion of Iraq (supported by a couple of dozens Arab countries); if it’s not the invasion of Iraq it’s the presence of American boots on Saudi soil, & Co, & Co. Still, the slow of intellect will, no doubt, have problems in getting the point.

3) Even within the very liberal, champagne-sipping walls of the ABC the simple principle of responsibility of one’s actions should find application. To ask terry Jones whether he feels responsible for what fanatical asses have done in Afghanistan is not only a betrayal of common sense, but a blatant disregard of that principle.

4) As already said, the events in Kabul prove Terry Jones’ case. The more the idiots react with such fanaticism to him, the more they prove that the problem is their fanaticism, and the religion fuelling it.

Terry Jones is not a genius, but he certainly has a point.

Mundabor

Terry Jones Is Not A Genius But He Certainly Has a Point, Part I

Ashes to ashes after all....

One can safely say that Terry Jones is, well, not a genius. One is at a loss to understand how a man can decide:

1) to announce that he is going to burn a Koran
2) to announce that he will wait for signals from the Holy Ghost about what to do;
3) to announce a very broad palette of events which he would consider being the word of the Holy Ghost not to do it;
4) when no one of the events occurs, to  decide not to do it anyway;

I do understand that some of our erring Proddie brothers make a great deal of what they imagine the Holy Ghost is telling to them, but from the way Terry Jones acts the Holy Ghost would seem to be rather unstable; which leads us to the unavoidable conclusion that the unstable one is, well, Terry Jones himself.

The Terry Jones saga now has a new chapter written (er….. burnt?), as the man, probably on the look for some more attention or needing some money, decided that the Holy Ghost has evidently changed his mind once again and has organised a sort of trial of the Koran (these people complain about the Holy Inquisition, I am sure…) at the end of which they, well, decided to burn it.

Let me say what I think of this specific action:

1) It is perfectly within the right of Mr. Terry Jones, or of every Mr. Joe Average, to burn a Koran. Mr. Jones lives in the Land Of The Free (USA) instead of in the Land Of The Politically Correct Cowards (United Kingdom) and he therefore has all the rights to exercise his freedom as he thinks fit.

2) The idea of staging a “trial to the Koran” is very childish. It shows once again that the man is on the look for a publicity stunt, and that his followers are certainly not picked amongst the brightest minds of that great nation.

3) The idea of burning the Koran (instead of, say, pronouncing the Koran heretical, or blasphemous, or outright idiotic and leave it at that; it’s a book, for Heaven’s sake, and it’s not even a trial!) is further proof that the man will do whatever brings him some notoriety. I am still waiting for an explanation from him about why the Holy Ghost would change His mind so often on the matter, but perhaps I’m asking too much.

In conclusion, I think that we can safely say that the man shows all the worst traits of Protestantism and is, certainly – not because of the burning of the Koran in itself, mind; but because of the ridiculous “Holy Ghost circus” and “wannabe Inquisition” habits of his – not good publicity for Christianity.

Having said that, the man most certainly has a point.

Which will be the subject of the next blog post.

Mundabor

 

 

On Youtube, Everyday Is Burn A Koran Day

Curious after the astonishingly fanatical – but in no way surprising – reaction of Muslim extremists, I did what I am sure many others have done: look on youtube and see what I can find there. It would seem that the idea has been very public for a while.

Here are just three among the many examples:

1) This is a young man playing apprentice Christian. Rather confused, poor chap, and with a strange mixture of political resentment and youthful aggression. He is very cost-conscious and goes for the economical solution: cheap paperback, in English. One assumes he did it whilst his parents were away. The fixed camera shows that he couldn’t even find a friend to handle the camera, but I do not think the offence to the Child Rapist will be considered less grave for that. And there you are, Koran unmistakably burning in technicolor…. Do yourself a favour, though, and switch off the audio…..

This has been put on youtube almost one year ago, when the world thought Terry Jones was the Monty Phyton actor. One wonders where the Muslim fanatics were?

2) This here is a rather more refined chap. He first covers his back making clear that the burning is covered by the First Amendment. In addition, his Koran shows a certain aesthetic discernment, but it is still paperback and it is still in English. This will, I am afraid, not qualify the exercise as sacrilegious by many a Muslim fanatic. They insist on Arabic, if you please.
This has been online, unless I am mistaken, since 2008. In the meantime, no world revolutions that I know of.

3) This here is the artist. One sees that he has put time, effort and money in the endeavour. He is also better educated, as his choice of material shows.
Impressive musical background (a real and well-chosen soundtrack, not Eminem). Nice book. Hardcover. Finely illustrated. In colour. In Arabic. This chap has all the bases covered.

This is from December 2007, no less. It wins the “burn a Koran day” hands down. To my knowledge, no mass killing because of this video.

There are many others, of course. On youtube. Publicly displayed. That have been there  for years.

Now one wonders: if the burning of a Koran is such a desecration deserving of a harsh punishment, why have all these video never unchained a revolution? No broadband? How can it be that such an allegedly scandalous desecration causes so much scandal if an unknown pastor leading a micro-community announces it, but no reaction when dozens of people have been doing the same publicly, for the entire planet to see, for years?

Another question: if the avoiding of the burning is so important, wouldn’t it be better to play it down? Don’t they think that if these controversies go on, these videos will rapidly multiply and become an “artistic genre” of its own? It is not difficult to burn a Koran anonymously in the privacy of your fireplace or garden, and you can put it on the internet for the entire world to see without fearing anything. First amendment, and all that….

Could it be that dear fanatic Islamists don’t give a dime for the burning Korans, but don’t lose an occasion to score some cheap self-victimhood point?

And please let us stop with the idea of the world revolution: the Arab world has been humiliated repeatedly in the last years, two of their countries invaded, others forced to choose between acquiescence and war. Nothing happened.

Mundabor

Inflammable Muslims and Recyclable Korans

Enjoy!

After reading this CNS story titled “interfaith leaders denounce anti-islamic actions, call for cooperation” (with the explicit reference to the questionable, but absolutely non-violent Koran-burning exercise planned by a small ecclesial community in Florida) I can’t avoid noticing the double standard.

When Muslim violence (I mean here people being killed, not American flags burned) simultaneously erupts in several parts of the (Muslim) world, the accent of the Western press is generally on the offence created to Muslims, but I can’t recall any massive call to Muslim countries to stop becoming violent every time there’s something they don’t like. They basically say “this cartoon creates violence” or “burning Korans create violence”.

Wrong. Violent people create violence. Cartoons may be in bad taste, but they are not violent. The pathetic attempt to construe cartoon-publishing and koran-burning as “violence” (pathetically espoused by a Muslim chap yesterday evening on the Muslim Self Victimhood Support Club, aka BBC World Service) is utterly devoid of any reality in fact. By depriving the words of their own meaning, leftists and Muslim fanatics open the door to the usual doublespeak so beloved by both leftists and Muslim fanatics the world over. If Koran burning is violence, then everything the Muslim perceive as offensive is violence, and then killing foreigners is just self-defence. Which is exactly the thinking of the Muslim fanatic.

“Oh, but this is our religion”, Muslim whiners always say. “Oh, but this is exactly our point“, we should answer.

Every appeal to not do what might upset Muslims actually encourages them to be upset, because 1) they see how well it works and 2) it encourages them into thinking that they are actually right.  This is the same as not doing everything which might upset a spoiled child. Correct the child instead, it works much better and is a long-term solution.

In the end, I have the strong feeling that the ecclesial community in Florida will announce that it renounces to perform the burning exercise. Still, I think that their initiative – apart from questions of taste – has already achieved its aim: to show the potential for senseless violence inherent in Islam. This should lead everyone to some serious reflections about what you invite in your country – irrespective of your religious convictions or opinion about the opportunity of the ceremony – by doing everything (yes, I am thinking of that Mosque) which encourages its spreading in the West.

Switzerland, a country blessedly deprived of political correctness and immune from the EU-disease, is clearly showing the way.

Mundabor

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